April 18, 2017

StackIQ Announces Support for Docker Community Edition, Swarm

AUSTIN, Texas, April 18, 2017 — StackIQ, makers of one of the industry’s fastest bare metal provisioning platform, Stacki, today announced support for Docker with a new Stacki Pallet. A Stacki Pallet is a set of software packages and code that run on the Stacki framework along with specialized installation and configuration information about applications. The new Stacki Pallet for Docker enables the consistency and configuration required for a functioning Docker installation. The Stacki Pallet for Docker runs Docker Community Edition (17.03.0), and has Docker Swarm mode baked in (installs and validates it automatically). StackIQ is exhibiting at DockerCon 17.

“Docker deployments that require consistent performance and high utilization should be run on bare metal,” said Joe Kaiser, Director of Open Source Engineering. “The Stacki Pallet with Docker Swarm Mode dramatically eases and accelerate Docker deployments on bare metal, taking the user from bare metal to containers in one step.”

Stacki is one of the fastest bare metal provisioning tools in the industry, with users reporting deployment times accelerated from weeks (manually) to mere hours with Stacki. Stacki’s bare metal cluster installer is popular in many use cases including DevOps, data center automation and refresh, lab automation and private cloud automation.

Well over a million Linux servers are under management by Stacki, and its open source sibling, the Rocks Cluster Distribution (Stacki includes software developed by the Rocks Cluster Group at the San Diego Supercomputer Center at the University of California, San Diego, and its contributors).

Stacki Pallet for Docker Swarm Resources:
Landing Page and Download links for the Stacki Pallet for Docker Community Edition and Docker Swarm.

Recorded Webinar: How to auto deploy Docker Swarm using the Stacki Pallet

StackiFest17

StackIQ’s annual user conference, StackiFest17 will be held in San Francisco on Thursday, April 27th. StackiFest brings together Stacki users and partners, for a full day of technical sessions on bare metal provisioning and how it applies to various use cases such as Hadoop cluster installs, containers, DevOps, data center automation, building appliances and private cloud automation. StackiFest17 will feature sessions from users including Flex, Empowered Benefits and NIST as well updates from the founders and CEO of StackIQ.

Registration, agenda, happy hour, and all about StackiFest17.

About Stacki

Open Source Stacki is a bare metal provisioning platform that is used by medium-sized and web scale enterprises to provision and manage bare metal clusters, some of which are as large as 3000+ nodes. Provisioning hundreds or thousands of nodes with Stacki’s parallel installer takes the same ease and nearly the same speed as provisioning one node.

Stacki Pallets contain software packages and code that run on the Stacki framework along with specialized installation and configuration information about applications such as Kubernetes and Hortonworks. Application Pallets are open source and are developed by the community as well as by StackIQ.

Stacki Pro is the commercial version of Stacki that includes support for additional Linux distributions, external storage platforms, an easy to use GUI, and dedicated support from the StackIQ engineering team. Stacki Pro enables customers to go from bare metal to a running application in a single step with full stack automation.

About StackIQ

StackIQ, the company that develops and supports Stacki, is venture-backed and was founded by some of the original developers of the Rocks Cluster Distribution at the San Diego Supercomputer Center. StackIQ helps customers automate the provisioning and management of small to large bare metal environments for a variety of use cases including big data, container deployment, building appliances, data center automation and private cloud automation. To date, the company has helped over 150 organizations automate over 1 Million Linux servers thereby saving over 560 years worth of manual installation and configuration tasks.


Source: StackIQ

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